5 Questions with Actor Aaron Glenane

Aaron Glenane as Michael Gudinski in Molly.

Aaron Glenane as Michael Gudinski in Molly

“Ill fares the race which fails to salute the arts with the reverence and delight which are their due.”
– Winston Churchill.


It was 1938 when Winston Churchill spoke these sentiments; the world was approaching a war that Britain would engage in for national survival. Yet, even on the brink of a shattering historic episode, one of the most powerful men in the world recognised the importance of the arts in defining it’s time and empowering it’s people.

Storytelling is fundamental to the preservation of civilisation; it reinforces a nation’s cultural and social interest, cultivating historical events which otherwise would dissolve with time. With each brush stroke and penned word, citizenries are enlightened to the melody of the times and the narrative of the creative visionary is ignited.

Born in rural Victoria, Australia, Aaron Glenane is the type of actor that takes the term “visionary” to another stratosphere. His work is all-embracing passion, fuelled with an undeniable tenderness, melting even the most cynical of hearts. His talents aren’t just restricted to an already impressive filmography, including the role of Mushroom Records founder, Michael Gudinski, in Molly for the Seven Network; Deadline Gallipoli; Home and Away; Janet King; working alongside Cate Blanchett and Robert Redford in Truth; Happy Feet 2; Drift; and more recently Killing Ground, which premiered at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival. Additionally, Aaron is a gifted stage actor and dancer whose credits include Tap Dogs, The Boy From Oz, and Orphans.

With his intrinsic versatility and beautifully defined characterisations, Aaron Glenane is destined to continue his path of creating wholehearted roles essential to the framework of our times.

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Theatre Angel: 5 Top Tips for Working in Costume with Fern McCauley

The Ripper Street Cast onset. Image: BBC America

The Ripper Street Cast onset. Image: BBC America

“It’s not just about the actors, the directors or your own team. Everyone is making this show happen and good working relationships are so important.”

Theatre, film, and TV bring imaginative worlds to life, transporting us through the magic of so many unseen creative hearts and minds. We so often celebrate actors, the ‘front-men/women’ of a production’s colossal galleon that is, in fact, sailed, steered, and charted by so many other (often unsung) talented artists: craftspeople and specialists. The very visual artistic screen and stage mediums owe much to their intricately styled and detailed costuming (evident in the jarring response we so often have to seeing, say, a watch on a Roman solider’s arm, instantly pulling us out of the world’s verisimilitude).

If you are one of these talented people who work so tirelessly behind the scenes to enrich our senses (and make actors’ lives so much easier), then we salute you! Or if, perhaps, you are an actor (or other creative) fascinated by the beautiful, tumbling world of silks, tapestries, scratchy old hessian sacks, gold, beading, and embroidery, then Casting Networks Australia is delighted to bring you these 5 Top Tips for Working in Costume with the gorgeous and talented Fern McCauley, actress and purveyor of costumes to the stars, who has worked on some of the UK’s best screen and stage projects.

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Outward Film Network and Their Ethos

ofn

This week Casting Networks caught up with the folk at Outward Film Network (OFN), a Midlands and London based filmmaking organisation that boast support for low and no budget filmmaking. Their remit is to support all those filmmakers who can’t reach the general population because they just don’t have the funds or support. What a great idea. So here we talk with one of the founders, Matthew Simmonds, about what they offer, how they can help actors and filmmakers, and what’s coming up for OFN.


Casting Networks: So can you tell us a little about Outward Film Network and how it came to be?

Outward Film Network: The Outward Film Network was setup to support, produce, and promote films shot on a no/low budget. Heading Outward is Matthew Simmonds, David Woods, and Phil Slatter. We’ve been making movies (short and feature) and writing about film for over fifteen years.

Outward looks to embrace an approach to making film that’s often considered as being amateur or “student” filmmaking. We don’t think it’s beneficial to be catagorised, we can’t afford to compete with indie films (20k + budget), and to be catagorised as amateur creates an even greater disconnect. Influenced by movements such Dogme 95 and mumblecore, we like to discuss and make films that don’t fall into the “indie” or “industry” category.

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The Importance and Value of Live Script Read Throughs

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After yet another smashing night of Manchester ADP’s supremely popular event ‘Scripts Aloud’ I’ve spoken to four of the key players: Jaki McCarrick, writer of the engaging and heartbreaking Bohemians; Kyle Walker, the soul performer in the emotional journey that is My Man (written by Kenton Thomas); and the two wonderful women who make all of it possible—Hannah Ellis and Diana Macleod.

We asked each of them the simple question:

How do these ADP read throughs benefit you?


Diana Macleod – Producer

Producing ADP is such a buzz. It’s really lovely to be able to create opportunities for people to do what they love. To see all the hard work come together at each show always leaves me on a high (I usually can’t sleep that night!). I’m an actor too and producing ADP has opened doors that probably never would have been open to me before.

The main thing for me is the community that it’s created. I’m relatively new to Manchester, and it’s been a really great way to make friends and get to know other creatives. ADP really does feel like a big family!

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5 Questions with Actor Socratis Otto

Socratis Otto

Socratis Otto

“The aim of art is to represent not the outward appearance of things, but their inward significance.” – Aristotle


It is only the beginning of 2017 and already humanity has witnessed both division and unity. We have watched the greatest super power of the free world change leadership, initiating a global movement, which has ignited the voices of the most influential people in the world. Their purpose alone empowers and motivates communities to develop ideas and engage in creativity.

The arts, much like civilization, is beautiful like that. With the stroke of imagination, the gift of a voice, and the power of character, we have the freedom to create work that echoes life’s gravities and the depths of the human soul. Things are never what they seem and the artist who benevolently portrays the boldest of parts with conviction is a powerful source.

Graduating from NIDA (National Institute of Dramatic Art) in 2000, Socratis Otto has become a household name amongst Australian audiences. With his striking features and smouldering curiosity he has birthed some of the most distinguished roles to date on the Australian Stage, TV, and Film arena.

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L.A. Survival Guide: Hustle or Die

"It is a privilege to follow your dreams in any city."

“It is a privilege to follow your dreams in any city.”

In mid 2014, I packed my bags and left my lovely, happy life in Sydney to move to Los Angeles to further pursue acting. I had lived there briefly in 2011. My then US agent sent me out for castings and meetings, and I had retained one resounding feeling towards the cement city of LA—distain.

After this short visit in 2011, I returned to Sydney determined to continue with my lovely life, however I could not shake the feeling that if I didn’t suck it up and officially make the move to LA, I was going to regret it. So three years later I finally did it, somewhat begrudgingly, filled with a sense of naivety and very little cash. I found a crappy apartment in the worst part of Hollywood and hoped for the best. Two and a half years later, I’m still considered a newbie in Los Angeles, and I still learn about this town and industry every day.

There are, however, two things I can say with total certainty—moving to LA to act has been personally and professionally the hardest, most challenging experience of my life, and without doubt, the best and most rewarding one. People talk a lot of smack about LA, but if you’re considering the big move from the beautiful shores of Australia because you feel there is something here for you, then I urge you to take the risk.

Here are a few tips and tricks I learnt along the way.

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Theatre Angel: 5 Top Tips for Kickstarting your London Career

Judi Dench, Luke Treadaway, Lesley Manville and Mark Gatiss come off stage at the Olivier Awards 2016. Image: Official London Theatre

Judi Dench, Luke Treadaway, Lesley Manville and Mark Gatiss come off stage at the Olivier Awards 2016. Image: Official London Theatre

London is undoubtedly theatre-lovers’ heaven—production variety, volume ,and quality are simply unrivaled. Londoners embrace theatre with the same enthusiasm and with as much gusto as Sydneysiders do brunch. Despite long work commutes, sky-high living costs, damp, dark, short days, and the exhausting, overcrowded daily battle, Londoners still find time for theatre. On any given evening, Leicester Square is packed with a throng of theatre-goers and shouting discount ticket sellers, Soho Theatre Bar is bursting at the seams, while away from the West-End, fringe theatres and pub venues spill out onto the footpaths, awash with the young blooded of theatre’s pumping pulse.

So you—stage-loving actor—land ready to tackle this wonderful world. You are British agentless, but with your hard-yakka Australian work ethic are confident that you can apply the same nouse to make it happen on the London stage.

Where to start?

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The Dance of the Tongue

ballet

In class, I often refer to voice & accent work as the dance of the tongue. As an ex dancer, I like approaching sound correction as a series of muscular exercises preparing you for your text. Essentially, the voice is muscular, rather than a disembodied sound that happens to come out of your mouth somehow.

An accent requires a precision and placement where the facial muscles and resonance completely changes. Even your natural speaking voice will be far more developed by doing your breathing, release, and resonance exercises along with some tongue twisters. And all of those are muscular exercises.

Certain authors are very challenging with sound combinations. The goal is not only to get the sounds correct but also getting the thoughts flowing easily off the tongue as if they are your own. The change of rhythm and placement of certain sounds can be as difficult as moving between a waltz and a foxtrot and as awkward as watching a ballet dancer try hip hop.

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10 Steps To 10X’ing Your Productivity As An Actor!

10X Your Productivity

Over the last 6 years, I’ve coached literally hundreds of actors on what it takes to set strategic goals, both inside and outside of their acting careers. If you missed my recent article for Casting Networks on that very process, check it out by clicking here. However, setting your goals is only one half of the equation here. To accomplish your goals, you’re going to need to find time to attack them—something many actors tell me they struggle with.

Do you often find yourself feeling very busy, but not very productive? We’ve all been there, and it’s no fun at all. You spend your entire day fighting mini-fires, doing menial tasks, and never actually get stuck into the things that you really desire from life. Well, in this article, I’d like to share 10 super-simple steps that you can take to literally 10x your productivity. Utilise these and you’ll not only wake up productive, but you’ll push your productivity to all new levels and beyond.

Let’s go!

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#BreatheMoveReact: Ali Chats to Shy Magsalin, Founder and Artistic Director of Ninefold

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Ninefold Ensemble

Hello! Hope you are all feeling motivated and back on track after a healthy, happy January!

This month I had the pleasure of chatting with Shy Magsalin, Artistic Director of Ninefold, a theatre ensemble, and member of the International Suzuki Company of Toga (SCOT).

The Suzuki Method of Actor Training is known for its rigorous physical performance style and intense, imaginatively rich works.
Shy founded the company, comprised of nine actors to investigate highly rigorous and disciplined ensemble performance-making.


ALY: What drew you to the Suzuki Method of Actor Training (SMAT)?

SHY MAGSALIN: I was initially drawn to the rigour and the discipline. The extreme energy and physical exertion gave me a completely chaotic experience in a very strict format. I was highly strung and very temperamental when I younger, so the training was initially a good container for all those fiery, erratic emotions. More interestingly, what’s kept me doing it for 10 years is the training’s intricate, imaginative work that I’ve been able to apply to all different types performances over the years. That’s the stuff I’m always keen to explore.

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