Act Smart! The best of my best new year’s planning

Act Smart! The best of my best new year’s planning

One good thing about having knocked around the planet for over half a century is that I’ve got enough years behind me to have test-driven a variety of annual planning methodologies, and enough wits still about me to retain some curiosity and enthusiasm over what comes next. (Well, I hope so, at any rate!)

That said, what has worked for me may not worked for you. And what worked 5 or 10 years ago may not work for either of us now. For example, at a certain point in your life, you may want to lean into a detailed, analytical system, like Jinny Ditzler’s Your Best Year Yet. Then, at another point, you may want to go for the more visceral, intuitive experience of creating a vision board. read more

Act Smart! Don’t fall for the flash

Act Smart! Don’t fall for the flash

Think back: do you remember the moment you knew you wanted to become an actor?

For many, it was watching a mesmerizing performance onscreen or onstage, one that seemed to reach out and speak truth to them and them alone. If you’re like me, there was an electric moment you actually experienced onstage—one where the world both disappeared and was more “there” than ever, and you felt some kind of magic power flowing through you. For (too many) others, it was watching their favorite performer clutch a gold statue in front of millions, or seeing some trumped-up, impeccably art-directed version of their life in a publication or piece of video.

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Act Smart! “Act” is a verb

Act Smart! “Act” is a verb

You’ve likely heard the expression “fake it ’til you make it” or its even pithier twin, “act ‘as if’“. At least, that was my assumption: that these two motivational blurbs meant the same thing: i.e., that until such a time as you’d actually made it to the top of whatever hill you were climbing, pretend you were already there.

I also thought that these two similar sayings were equally wise, universally applicable truths, and would work on whatever stage I applied them, actual or world. After all, I’d been hearing “fake it ’til you make it” my entire life, and wasn’t aspiring to greatness (and living beyond one’s means until one got there) the American way?

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Act Smart! The back-to-school mindset

Act Smart! The back-to-school mindset

I don’t know whether it’s being a September baby, someone who doesn’t tolerate heat well, or just a plain old nerd, but my favorite season has always been fall, a.k.a. Back-to-School season. Just like the new chronological year, a new school year speaks of possibilities, potential, and other great, clean-slate things.

Even though we don’t live with academic years as adults, we can borrow the best of those good old school days to rejuvenate our acting lives. Because doing the same thing with no variation can lead to a lackluster approach, and acting hardly thrives on that. Here are a few ways to add some new-year newness, starting now.read more

Act Smart! 3 ways to switch things up for success

Act Smart! 3 ways to switch things up for success

I don’t know about you, but these days, the mere thought of adding one more thing to my plate makes me feel like my head will explode. And yes, decluttering is great, as are quick things you can do to improve your life/health/career, but during the dog days of summer, sometimes the best thing you can do is the old switcheroo. Here are a few ways I’ve found to switch one thing for another that helped me; hopefully, one or two will spark an idea for you, too.

1. Leave five minutes early instead of five minutes late.

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Act Smart: Annual Mid-Year Check-In

Act Smart: Annual Mid-Year Check-In

Uncharacteristically, I did not plot out my goals this year, publicly or privately, as I have in years past. But while I don’t have a normal mid-year “recap” to share, I still believe in being honest with oneself, preferably out loud, every six months or so, to ensure that too much time doesn’t slip away unnoticed. Think of a mid-year check-in as a way of seeing what adjustments you might need to make in the areas you feel need your attention. The first step toward changing anything is focusing your attention to that which needs to be changed: either to do less or more of something.

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Act Smart: What You Can learn From a Day Job

For the past 3+ months, I’ve been enjoying my first time back among the ranks of the fully-employed in 25 years. And I’m not kidding when I say “enjoy”—far from finding the 9-to-5 (or in my case, 8-to-4) burdensome, I’ve found it quite freeing, and in ways I wasn’t really expecting.

Since many, if not most, actors need some kind of day job to survive, I thought it might be worth enumerating what I’m learning from my new gig, how it’s shaping the rest of my life (including my creative outlook—and output!), and other reasons why that thing you may be regarding as a set of shackles could be the very thing that frees you.

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Act Smart: Avoiding Burnout

burnout

If you’re an actor, chances are you’re working too much. In the beginning, you’re working three jobs, by default: the job of training yourself as an actor; the job of working as an actor (which includes auditioning, performing, and attendant/appropriate business activities you have, such as marketing and networking); and, unless you’re independently wealthy, the job that puts food on the table while you work the other eight or so jobs you have of “being” an actor.

With all of that working, you somehow need to free up time to play, relax, and stay fresh. (Or not, but trust me, it’s going to be hard to keep that acting fresh if you’re a scattered, nervous wreck.) You likely don’t have much wiggle room in that day job, so it’s up to you to learn to manage your time and energy on fronts performance-related. That’s going to mean saying “no” as well as saying “yes”: simple in principle, but never easy when there are carrots being dangled or guilt trips being booked for you.

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Act Smart: Stay and Play in the Moment

play

For staying power, play in the moment.

Whether it’s the weather, or the uncertain state of the economy, or the endless grind of politics, things have been a little grim lately, a little serious. And while the tendency during hard times is to bear down and get serious along with them, I am starting to believe that the answer, while wholly counterintuitive, is to ease up—to play.

People—and I include among “people” everyone from audiences to casting directors to colleagues to fans (present and future)—are starved for levity and passion. Those can be hard to muster in the face of grim times and prospects, but as artists, it’s our job to lead the way. We have to be the change we want to see in the world, to get all Gandhi-fuzzy on you; we have to put aside that life is hard and times are tough, and get back to the spirit that brought us here: play. But how do we, the artists, get ourselves there when the getting is hard? How do we keep ourselves fresh and alive, and, if you want to get down to it, marketable?

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Act Smart: Don’t Quit Your “A” Job

bullion

We’ve each gotta do what we’ve gotta do to get the bills paid. If we’re really lucky, we’re getting paid to do the thing we want to do the most, i.e., “acting for dollars,” as my friend O-Lan dubs it.

But there are inevitable stretches where life can start to feel like one of two very dangerous things.

The first is a fairly common phenomenon for most of us at some point in our acting careers, especially the beginning point: that head-down, nose-to-the-grindstone, bring-home-the-bacon (or appropriate vegan substitute) time. You know—the months (or years) when it feels like we’re scrambling to make rent, pay the utilities, and keep ourselves in current headshots. During these times, it’s extremely helpful to have what friends in the recovery world call a “B” job: some non-taxing, reasonably well-paying job that covers our monthly expenses and leaves some time and resources left over to pursue The Vision, a.k.a. the for-now dream of becoming a professional actor.

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